How will the Safe Harbor ruling effect your business?

How will the Safe Harbor ruling effect your business?

Written by Richard Adams on Wednesday, 14 October 2015. Posted in Data capture, Safe Harbor

Last week, the European Court of Justice (CJEU) ruled the ‘Safe Harbor Privacy Principles’ invalid.

This decision was reached after Max Schrems, an Austrian citizen, filed a complaint with the Irish Data Protection Commissioner, asking them to prohibit Facebook from transferring his personal data to the US after Edward Snowden claimed the US did not adequately protect personal data from NSA surveillance activities.

The ruling has potentially far-reaching consequences on businesses who transfer data across the Atlantic.

Process Director by BP Logix recognised in the Gartner 'Magic Quadrant for iBPMS' for 2015

Process Director by BP Logix recognised in the Gartner 'Magic Quadrant for iBPMS' for 2015

Written by Alan Ingram on Monday, 12 October 2015. Posted in Business Process Management, Process Director, Gartner Magic Quadrant for iBPMS

ePC is pleased to announce Process Director by BP Logix has been recognised by Gartner in the “Magic Quadrant for Intelligent Business Process Management Suites (iBPMS) 2015″.

According to the report, the iBPMS market is the natural evolution of the earlier BPMS market, adding more emphasis on support for greater system and human intelligence within business processes. Capabilities such as “what if” process simulation, optimisation and the ability to gain insight into process performance have been included in many BPMS offerings for several years. iBPMSs have added enhanced support for human collaboration, integration with social media, mobile access to processes, more analytics and real-time decision management. An iBPMS orchestrates work to produce business outcomes that go far beyond typical process efficiency and performance measures.

For its 2015 iBPMS Magic Quadrant, Gartner evaluated platforms based on their ability to orchestrate increasingly complex work styles.

Gartner-Magic-Quadrant-for-iBPMS

Gartner noted, BP Logix Process Timeline technology provides the process owner with key insights into the behaviour of each process instance. If, at any point, it determines that any future task—or the process as a whole—is in danger of running late, then Process Director can take action directly, or notify the process owner to intercede manually. Process Timeline is easy to use and flexible. Tasks can be linked dynamically using rules or by identifying predecessors. Ad-hoc and improvisational tasks can be easily added to a process as needed. Additionally, BP Logix Elastic BPM cloud is offered in single-tenant and multi-tenant deployments. The multi-tenant offering provides an attractive entry point for smaller applications, while the single tenant offering supports more robust enterprise requirements.

BP Logix deserve to be recognised by Gartner as they continue to provide great software with real power that is far more dynamic, flexible and cost effective than many of the quadrant long-timers

Alan Ingram, Technical Director, ePC
Five considerations when planning for workflow and BPM

Five considerations when planning for workflow and BPM

Written by Alan Ingram on Thursday, 08 October 2015. Posted in Business Process Management, Workflow automation

We get to work with some really innovative and interesting companies. But before we talk at any level of detail with a potential customer, we do a significant amount of research to learn more about their business, industry, organisational structure and where they have had successes and challenges. It is sometimes lengthy work, but is always incredibly helpful, as it gives us a foundation to understand that organisation and to identify both needs - and wants.

Wireless in the real world

Wireless in the real world

Written by Richard Adams on Wednesday, 01 July 2015. Posted in Press coverage, PC Pro, Information Technology

This article was published in PC Pro magazine in July 2015 (issue 249, page 114) and features comments from Alan Ingram (Technical Director).

Around a year ago, PC Pro received an email from reader Alan Ingram with a plea for help. He wrote:

One aspect of Wi-Fi technology that seems to have been forgotten about is point-to-point connections. I’m responsible for two sites that employ point-to-point Wi-Fi to link buildings. Both have challenges of distance, line-of-sight and so on. But after a lot of messing around, the best solution I came up with has been a pair of Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 running DD-WRT connected up to D-Link ANT24-210021dBi directional 11g grid antennas. This gave me a reasonably quick connection (a little of 20Mbits/sec) over a few hundred metres, even when line-of-sight was iffy at best.

However, this kit is now seven years old. With VDSL I could theoretically achieve similar speeds by routing the data halfway around the country via a consumer-level broadband connection to each building; there must be a better solution now?

The problem seems to be that most of the advances in Wi-Fi are around MIMO, which require a router looking like a Christmas tree, with more and more antennas. This doesn’t lend itself well to directional antennas from what I can gather. Has there been a wireless standard or router since 802.11g that’s designed for single antennas, that allows for better stability and throughput than 802.11G?

Alan is Founder and Technical Director at ePartner Consulting Ltd in Lightwater, Surrey, a company that’s heavily into areas such as business process management, workflow automation and data capture. The company uses its site-to-site wireless link mainly for things such as VM replication, where Alan reports that the initial copying can take days.

Buyers beware!

Buyers beware!

Written by Richard Adams on Wednesday, 01 April 2015. Posted in Press coverage, PC Pro, Information Technology

This letter was written by Alan Ingram (Technical Director) and published in PC Pro magazine in April 2015 (issue 246, page 30).

For many years, my advice to online buyers has been to purchase with a credit card. This way, if something goes wrong, you have someone on your side who has a legal imperative to refund your money, even if the original vendor disappears.

Now PayPal and Apple are marketing themselves as ubiquitous payment systems for purchases. You can buy anything from anyone, even from physical vendors, using such services – but they aren’t covered by the Consumer Credit Act. Although PayPal highlights its “Buyer Protection”, my experience is that, unless the details of the transaction and procedure you followed fall within its defined small print, you won’t be covered. With credit card transactions, the Consumer Credit Act provides consumer protection first and foremost, with no burden on the consumer to meet any arbitrary requirements.

Will Apple’s new payment-processing system be any more effective in protecting consumers? Until the legislators catch up, people need to be made aware of just what they’re giving away by clicking that seemingly inconsequential option of paying by PayPal!

Read the full letter here.

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